In-Deed Conveyancing

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About In-Deed conveyancing

> Fixed conveyancing fees
> No completion, no fee
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In-Deed, Why we're here

At In-Deed, we think arranging your conveyancing should be simple, fast and cost-effective. That’s why we are dedicated to offering a quality, bespoke service that focuses on three crucial areas we know matter most to you – speed, communication and value for money. Click here to learn more about In-Deed, the team, our approach and what our customers say about us.

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Transfer of Equity

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Conveyancing made simple

Whether you’re a first-time buyer or been round the property merry-go-round several times, it’s easy to feel bamboozled by what’s involved in purchasing a property.
In-Deed’s straightforward guide to the conveyancing process cuts through the legal jargon to explain what lies ahead.

 

What is conveyancing?

Conveyancing is the name for the legal work required when property or land is bought and sold.
The end goal for a solicitor or licensed conveyancer is to register the title, or legal ownership, in the new owner’s name.

 

What does a conveyancing solicitor do?

A seller’s solicitor draws up binding contracts to be signed by both sides, while the buyer’s solicitor liaises with a lender to prove the buyer has the funds to buy the property.
When buying, your conveyancing solicitor will also pay other essential legal fees and charges, such as Stamp Duty Land Tax (SDLT).
First-time buyers in England don’t pay SDLT on the first £300,000 of a transaction. In Wales, the Land Transaction Tax (LTT) only applies to sales of more than £180,000.

 

When do I need a solicitor?

When buying, instruct a conveyancing solicitor when you want to make an offer. Sellers should instruct as soon as they get an offer.
At In-Deed, we match you with a specialist property solicitor who can act for you immediately. We will give you a fixed-price quote with our No Completion, No Fee guarantee and talk you through all the fees and charges you’ll pay.
All members of In-Deed’s panel are regulated by the Solicitors Regulatory Authority and are also on the mortgage lenders’ panels, so they can act for you and your lender.

 

What’s in the contract?

The seller’s solicitor will provide proof the seller has the legal right to sell the property. The draft contract also includes the sale price and details any fixtures and fittings in the sale.
The seller must also provide an Energy Performance Certificate, summarising the property’s energy efficiency.

 

Do I need a survey?

Mortgage lenders will demand a valuation report, which confirms the property is worth the purchase price. It is not a building survey and will not reveal any structural issues.
So, depending on the age and condition of the home you’re buying, you may want to instruct a building survey.

 

What kind of survey should I get?

There are several survey options. A Home Buyer’s Report usually includes a valuation and will reveal obvious problems such as wet or dry rot, dampness and subsidence.
A Building Survey does not include a valuation but is more detailed.
In-Deed’s sister site, Surveyor Local, offers a range of affordable surveys from chartered surveyors who are members of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors.

 

What are conveyancing searches?

Searches are essential enquiries that help build a picture of the property and its surroundings.
Read more about conveyancing searches in our expansive guide.

 

Avoiding delays

Searches may delay the conveyancing process because the solicitor relies on councils and other organisations to return information.
Conveyancing can also slow down if a chain is involved. First-time buyers are at the bottom of a chain and often frustrated by hold-ups elsewhere.
Avoid delays by completing any paperwork and returning it to your solicitor promptly.

 

Show them the money

A buyer must prove they have the money. Their legal team will send a copy of the lender’s mortgage offer on to the seller’s solicitor to show they have the finance.
Where no mortgage is involved, your solicitor will ask for proof of funds, which is shared with the seller.

 

I’m buying leasehold. Is that an issue?

Buying a leasehold property can complicate and slow down a sale because a third party – the freeholder – is involved.
A Leasehold Management Pack with full details about the lease and annual fees and charges is an essential part of conveyancing.

 

Exchanging contracts

Once contracts are exchanged, neither side can back out. The exchange is usually done by telephone when the two solicitors confirm the contracts each holds are identical.
The buyer now gives their solicitor a deposit, usually 10 percent, which is transferred to the seller’s solicitor. Then a final check is done with the Land Registry to ensure the property’s title has not been altered.
With the sale confirmed, both sides agree on a completion date.

 

Completion date

Expect a gap between the contracts being exchanged and completion. It can happen on the same day, but the transfer of funds can delay things.
In advance of completion, the buyer’s solicitors will ask the lender to transfer the mortgage funds to their account.
On the day itself, the money is transferred to the seller’s solicitor. Only once they have the funds will they authorise the key release. This can be a frustrating day as you’re relying on the bank transfer to happen smoothly.
The keys are usually handed to the estate agent, but other arrangements can be made.

 

Closing conveyancing

The seller’s solicitor requests a mortgage redemption certificate and pays off any outstanding mortgage, taking their own fees and paying any other fees. What’s left goes to the seller who must now move out.
Meanwhile, the buying solicitor completes the conveyancing by paying any due SDLT or LTT within 30 days and registering the new title with the Land Registry.
Now the buyer can move in and start making themselves at home sweet home!

Instant conveyancing quote

  • We only work with top quality conveyancing solicitors who meet our exacting standards.

  • We empower our customers throughout the conveyancing process, from start to finish.

  • We speak in plain English. Our approach and language is simple and clear.

  • Our solicitors are proactive in how they reach our customers and other parties.

  • Fixed fees with no additional charges.

 

     >  Sale

 

            >  Purchase

 

            >  Transfer of Equity

 

      >  Remortgage

 

>  Lease Extension

Instant conveyancing quote

  • We only work with top quality conveyancing solicitors who meet our exacting standards.

  • We empower our customers throughout the conveyancing process, from start to finish.

  • We speak in plain English. Our approach and language is simple and clear.

  • Our solicitors are proactive in how they reach our customers and other parties.

  • Fixed fees with no additional charges.

>  Sale

>  Purchase

>  Transfer of Equity

>  Remortgage

>  Lease Extension

Conveyancing Glossary

Conveyancing FAQs

Conveyancing Process

Conveyancing Guides

Ask a Solicitor

Conveyancing Guides

Confused about conveyancing? The answers to all your questions about buying and selling a property can be found here in In-Deed’s comprehensive guides. We cover all the legal work involved and explain the fees and charges you’ll pay.